Best Trees for Texas

Source:  Xeriscape…Landscape Water Conservation

Watering Trees

Newly planted trees should be watered frequently until they are well rooted, which may take two growing seasons. Once established, trees should be watered less frequently so they will develop deep roots and be better able to withstand drought.

In the absence of rain, most trees benefit from a once-a-month, thorough watering during the growing season. Normal lawn watering is not a substitute for thorough tree watering. The feeding root system of a tree or shrub is located within the top 12 inches of the soil and at the “dripline” of the plant. The dripline is the area directly below the outermost reaches of the branches. Apply water and fertilizer from just inside to a little beyond the dripline, not at the trunk. Simply lay a slowly running hose on the ground and move it around the dripline as each area becomes saturated to a depth of 8 to 10 inches. For large trees, this watering technique may take several hours.

Xeriscape™

To reduce the excessive use of water for maintaining landscapes, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service encourages Texans to adopt Xeriscape landscaping. This concept conserves water and protects the environment. Xeriscape landscapes need not be cactus and rock gardens. They can be cool, green landscapes full of beautiful plants maintained with water-efficient practices.

plant-adaptation-map

Common name (link to pictures) / Best adapted for Map Region / Notes

* = Texas Native

Small Trees (20 to 35 feet tall)

  1. American plum / 5 / White blooms in spring; sour fruit good for jelly
  2. Aristocrat pear / 1,3,4,5,6 / Spring flowers; fall color
  3. Bradford pear / 1,3,4,5,6 / Spring flowers; fall color
  4. *Canaert redcedar / 7 / Evergreen for specimen or windbreak
  5. Chinese pistache / 7 / Spreading canopy; fall color
  6. Crabapple / 1,3,4,5,6 / Spring flowering tree; many varieties
  7. *Desert willow / 2,3,4,5,6 / Snapdragon-like flowers in summer; willow-like foliage
  8. *Dogwood / 1 / Graceful tree; large spring blooms of white and pink
  9. Eldarica pine / 2,3,4,6 / Best pine for alkaline soils; Christmas-tree shaped
  10. Fan d’Arc osage orange /  7 / Improved fruitless selection
  11. *Honey mesquite / 2,3,4,6 / Lacy spreading form
  12. Japanese black pine / 7 / Rounded small tree; adapted to alkaline soils
  13. Japanese persimmon / 7 / Edible showy fruit; glossy green foliage
  14. *Mexican plum / 7 / Fragrant spring flowers; attractive trunk
  15. Nanking cherry / 5 / Tough, fruiting, shrubby tree
  16. Panicled golden raintree / 3,4,5,6 / Showy flowers and seed pods
  17. Pink lady / 5 / Alkaline-tolerant; deciduous; light green foliage; showy seeds in fall
  18. *Redbud / 7 / Spring blooming; excellent varieties: Oklahoma and Forest Pansy
  19. *Slash pine / 1 / Evergreen pine
  20. *Soapberry / 7 /  Fall color
  21. *Texas ebony / 2 / Airy foliage and flowers
  22. *Wild olive / 2 / White flowers and bold foliage

Large Trees (above 35 feet tall)

  1. Austrian black pine  / 5 / Adapted to wind and cold
  2. *Bald cypress / 1,2,3,4,6 / Deciduous conifer; fine-textured foliage; fall color
  3. *Black walnut / 1,5 / Good tree but tends to be messy
  4. Blue spruce / 5 / Grayish-blue needles
  5. *Bur oak / 7 / Bold foliage; huge acorns
  6. *Cedar elm / 7 / Upright growth habit; good street tree
  7. *Chinquapin oak / 1,2,3,4,6 / Round-topped tree; bold foliage
  8. Deodar cedar / 7 / Bluish-green conifer
  9. *Hackberry / 5 / Variety ‘Shademaster’ particularly recommended for region 5
  10. Honey locust / 2,3,4,5,6 / Thornless varieties available
  11. Kentucky coffee tree / 5 / Upright tree; fine-textured foliage
  12. Lace bark elm / 7 / Textured bark; spreading shade tree
  13. *Live oak / 1,2,3,4,6 / Evergreen shade tree
  14. *Loblolly pine / 1 / Evergreen pine
  15. *Pecan / 7 / State tree of Texas; edible nuts
  16. Ponderosa pine / 5 / Bushy, attractive tree
  17. *Shumard oak / 1,2,3,4,5 / Fall color
  18. *Southern magnolia /  1  / Bold evergreen tree; large white blooms throughout summer
  19. *Sweetgum /  1  / Upright growth habit; fall color
  20. *Texas red oak / 7 / Fall color
  21. *Water oak / 1 / Holds foliage well into winter

Find more Texas Trees:  http://texastreeid.tamu.edu

 

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